By Clare Almand
22 Nov

Let’s Get Physical

Friday, November 22, 2013

I used to be a real health nut. I worked out at least five days a week, watched what I ate, and read all those fitness magazines. I felt strong. I felt healthy. I was 18 and terrified of gaining the Freshman 15.

My hard work and constant fear of being overweight successfully kept the pounds off for most of college. But over the years, the fear and discipline has gradually declined to the point where I have finally gained those 15 pounds, albeit eight years later.

I recently went on a freelance assignment, which relocated me to a hotel. For two months, I spent 12 hours a day in an office chair and then traded that chair for a bar stool at the hotel restaurant. My diet was bad; my movement was minimal. Needless to say, when I finally got home and got on the scale, it wasn’t pretty. Mostly because the scale didn’t give me a number, it just read, “GO RUN” in big digital letters.

My heart condition being stable has kind of been a double-edged sword. I should be more conscious of my health because of my condition, but that was never the main reason for my eating healthfully and exercising. And now that I am actually approaching an unhealthy weight, all that discipline and fear that I had as a teenager should be coming back in full force. However, it’s not that easy. The holidays are coming up. That means a lot of temptation with fatty foods and sweets.

So, how does everyone do it? If my CHD isn’t enough of an incentive to kick my butt into shape, what will do the trick? What works for the rest of you?

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