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The opinions expressed by ACHA bloggers and those providing comments on the ACHA Blog are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of the Adult Congenital Heart Association or any employee thereof. ACHA is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the ACHA bloggers.

The contents of this blog are presented for informational purposes only, and should not be substituted for professional advice. Always consult your physicians with your questions and concerns.

By ACHA on 5/9/2014 9:24 AM

By Katherine Buchanan

I biked up the steepest hill on campus yesterday morning after leaving my last fitness class of the semester. After my open heart surgery this Christmas I decided to come back to school and take a personal fitness course, hoping to build my strength and endurance to better than it was before the operation.

Our first class was a little over a month and a half after my surgery, and so my abilities were pretty limited. I was slower than my classmates, and while I did feel more energized than I had first semester, I was still sluggish and tired. However, as time distanced me from the surgery, I gained more energy and ability.

By ACHA on 3/13/2014 10:55 AM

By Katherine Buchanan

When I found out I was going to have open heart surgery to repair my leaking mitral valve, I was terrified. Like others in the congenital heart disease community, I grew up thinking I was cured of my original defects—the cleft in my mitral valve and atrial septal defect—and had never heard the term "congenital heart disease" applied to me before.

When the doctors told me that this term was now part of my life and surgery was necessary within the year, I was overcome with fear. Before I knew of the heart problem I lived under the notion that I had the potential to live my life to the fullest—whether that be through my singing, studies or dreams of world travel. I envisioned an exciting future with many adventures ahead, but the news of open heart surgery tore at the foundations of my dreams.