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CHD and the Law: The Heart of a Soldier
Top 5 Reasons to Attend the ACHA Conference
The Disclosing Decision
Not Your “Normal Holiday”
How Facebook Helped Me Get to (Cardiac) Rehab
Not My Average Heart Year
Tips for Cardiac Parents, Part 2
Part 2 and a Connection
Baby Steps
Sharing My Adoption Story
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The opinions expressed by ACHA bloggers and those providing comments on the ACHA Blog are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of the Adult Congenital Heart Association or any employee thereof. ACHA is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the ACHA bloggers.

The contents of this blog are presented for informational purposes only, and should not be substituted for professional advice. Always consult your physicians with your questions and concerns.

Author: Created: 5/17/2011 1:10 PM RssIcon
Our ACHA bloggers will post about many topics relevant to the CHD community.
By ACHA on 7/15/2014 2:41 PM

By Michael Pernick

This blog series features stories involving congenital heart disease and the law. The blog posts may discuss contemporary or historical court decisions, laws or regulations, or other legal issues that relate to CHD. These posts are purely for entertainment and educational purposes and are not legal advice. Any opinions expressed in this series of posts are solely those of the author and do not represent the Adult Congenital Heart Association.

Sheldon Monroe is a Korean War veteran. He entered the service in September 1951, thinking he was entirely healthy. He had been a member of his college basketball and football teams. He was shocked when, shortly after basic training, a physical examination revealed a severe heart murmur. He was soon diagnosed with a ventricular septal defect. He served for two years and was honorably discharged in 1953.

By ACHA on 7/11/2014 2:50 PM

By the ACHA National Conference Planning Team

There are less than two months until our 7th National Conference in Chicago! We hope you will join us on September 5-7, and here's our top 5 reasons why:

By ACHA on 7/9/2014 1:39 PM

By Meghann Ackerman

When you stop and think about it, there’s a lot of medical talk that comes with dating. Generally, it’s focused around sexually transmitted infections and there seems to be a consensus among decent people that you disclose that sort of thing before being sexually active with a new partner.

But what about other medical issues? I’ve mentioned before that Victor isn’t big on wearing shirts, especially when it’s hot, so the fact that he had a heart condition was never really a secret. I can’t remember how long we were together before I got around to asking about the specifics, but that gnarly scar down the middle of his chest gave me the heads up that something was going on.

By ACHA on 7/2/2014 1:42 PM

By Paul Willgoss

Is my passport in date?
Yup, I’m legal to go to Switzerland

Is my travel insurance still OK?
Yup, travel insurance can be a pain in the backside for GUCHs, but I’m still covered by the travel insurance that comes with my bank account.

By ACHA on 6/30/2014 11:31 AM

By Brenna Isaacson

I sat there staring at the phone. My mom’s last words echoing in my head, “Call cardiac rehab, set up an appointment.” I was terrified. The fact that I was even awake was a good sign and now they wanted me to walk on a treadmill? I could barely walk across the house without getting winded. I was just starting to hold down food again and now they wanted me to get dressed, stop clutching my pillow to my broken sternum, and heal? Who were these monsters?

By ACHA on 6/27/2014 11:20 AM

By Jennifer Gooden

Up until this point in my life, whenever I would go to my twice-a-year cardiology appointments, I would do and hear roughly the same thing. I would get my vitals, EKG, and echo done and then my doc would come in and chat with me and tell me things look “about the same” and that I should continue with my meds—and I would keep on trucking along. That was my average heart year.

Unfortunately, this isn’t my average heart year. I would say that I am having the worst heart year ever. In my last blog post I explained that I was admitted for the first time in more than 20 years. Well so far this year I have been admitted three times, have worn no fewer than five Holter monitors, plus a BP monitor, and have had my first cardiac ablation.

By ACHA on 6/25/2014 9:34 AM

By Yvonne Hall

In the fall, before my daughter’s latest crisis, I posted the first in a series of tidbits I wanted to share with parents of cardiac patients on what I have learned through decades of trial and error. Some of these memories are positive but others will address where possibly better choices could have been made. This message relates to how easy it is to forget our other children‘s needs during such times.

By ACHA on 6/23/2014 12:52 PM

By Alissa Butterfass

First, an update: When I last blogged, it was weeks before an upcoming cardiac catheterization. My doctor was hoping to attain images and measurements not accessible in other tests, and I was hoping to finally get an answer to what my exercise limitations are, and whether I could actually try to take up running or participate in a half marathon walk with my cousin.

The catheterization took place in late April. Even though only diagnostics were performed and no interventions were necessary, the recovery was more difficult than I anticipated—a massive headache for three days, likely due to dehydration, and a sore leg at the site of the catheter placement for a week.

By ACHA on 6/19/2014 12:25 PM

By Jon Ritchings, Jr.

I am loving this summer. After an extremely brutal winter it’s been wonderful getting outside again. The winter cold forced me to give up my daily walks. I’ve worked hard nearly every day to get in even better shape than I was last year. Well, that and lose the 20 pounds I gained.

I’ve set two goals for myself that I intend to hit by the end of September. One is to be able to run the three miles that I currently walk every day. The other is to lose those 20 pounds I gained this past winter. I’ve tried to do this a few times since my last surgery. In the past I’ve gone at it full blast, changing my diet and adding a lot of exercise all at once. Usually I do well the first few weeks, losing a few pounds and feeling good about the changes. Then, life gets in the way and the whole thing falls apart within a few days.

By ACHA on 6/17/2014 1:54 PM

By Kim Russell

“She will not be able to bear children,” the doctor said. Of course, this was disappointing, but understandable. “She can’t have children?” my mother asked the doctor.

The doctor shook his head. “No, I said she cannot bear children. She will need to adopt. And there are many children out there who need good families.”