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Disclaimer

The opinions expressed by ACHA bloggers and those providing comments on the ACHA Blog are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of the Adult Congenital Heart Association or any employee thereof. ACHA is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the ACHA bloggers.

The contents of this blog are presented for informational purposes only, and should not be substituted for professional advice. Always consult your physicians with your questions and concerns.

Author: Created: 5/17/2011 1:10 PM RssIcon
Our ACHA bloggers will post about many topics relevant to the CHD community.
By ACHA on 7/29/2014 9:32 AM

By Kim Edgren

Back in grade school, pre-Rastelli procedure, I had a gym teacher say to me as I stood on the sidelines, “You look healthy enough to play!” The purple lips and purple fingernails along with my health record should've told her otherwise but yet, to her, I looked healthy enough to participate in her class.

The comment has stuck with me, and to this day I still struggle with looking like I should be able to be athletic and push myself more. And even in full congestive heart failure, I struggled with accepting the “I can’t” and still went with the “I’ll try.”

By ACHA on 7/25/2014 12:37 PM

By Beth Adams, DO

… as the morning unfolds, the patients who sticks in my mind is the youngest of the day, a 9-day-old baby with a very thick heart.

Anna (not her real name) was supposed to be a normal, healthy baby, after a normal, healthy pregnancy. But she’s not. Before going home from the hospital, one of her doctors heard a heart murmur, and her problem was discovered. No one teaches doctors how to give bad news—at least, no one did when I was training. You sort of figure it out as you go along, by watching what works, what doesn’t work, and trying to read people as you go along.

By ACHA on 7/23/2014 12:55 PM

By Beth Adams, DO

This month I thought I’d take some time to give you all the insider’s look into a day in the life of a congenital cardiologist. This is meant to be an average day, not one that necessarily stands out in my mind. I hope you enjoy this insider’s scoop:

0515
The alarm clock goes off, but I’m already awake and have been for a little while. I run my mental list of the day’s tasks, focusing on anything that may be outside the norm.

By ACHA on 7/15/2014 2:41 PM

By Michael Pernick

This blog series features stories involving congenital heart disease and the law. The blog posts may discuss contemporary or historical court decisions, laws or regulations, or other legal issues that relate to CHD. These posts are purely for entertainment and educational purposes and are not legal advice. Any opinions expressed in this series of posts are solely those of the author and do not represent the Adult Congenital Heart Association.

Sheldon Monroe is a Korean War veteran. He entered the service in September 1951, thinking he was entirely healthy. He had been a member of his college basketball and football teams. He was shocked when, shortly after basic training, a physical examination revealed a severe heart murmur. He was soon diagnosed with a ventricular septal defect. He served for two years and was honorably discharged in 1953.

By ACHA on 7/11/2014 2:50 PM

By the ACHA National Conference Planning Team

There are less than two months until our 7th National Conference in Chicago! We hope you will join us on September 5-7, and here's our top 5 reasons why:

By ACHA on 7/9/2014 1:39 PM

By Meghann Ackerman

When you stop and think about it, there’s a lot of medical talk that comes with dating. Generally, it’s focused around sexually transmitted infections and there seems to be a consensus among decent people that you disclose that sort of thing before being sexually active with a new partner.

But what about other medical issues? I’ve mentioned before that Victor isn’t big on wearing shirts, especially when it’s hot, so the fact that he had a heart condition was never really a secret. I can’t remember how long we were together before I got around to asking about the specifics, but that gnarly scar down the middle of his chest gave me the heads up that something was going on.

By ACHA on 7/2/2014 1:42 PM

By Paul Willgoss

Is my passport in date?
Yup, I’m legal to go to Switzerland

Is my travel insurance still OK?
Yup, travel insurance can be a pain in the backside for GUCHs, but I’m still covered by the travel insurance that comes with my bank account.

By ACHA on 6/30/2014 11:31 AM

By Brenna Isaacson

I sat there staring at the phone. My mom’s last words echoing in my head, “Call cardiac rehab, set up an appointment.” I was terrified. The fact that I was even awake was a good sign and now they wanted me to walk on a treadmill? I could barely walk across the house without getting winded. I was just starting to hold down food again and now they wanted me to get dressed, stop clutching my pillow to my broken sternum, and heal? Who were these monsters?

By ACHA on 6/27/2014 11:20 AM

By Jennifer Gooden

Up until this point in my life, whenever I would go to my twice-a-year cardiology appointments, I would do and hear roughly the same thing. I would get my vitals, EKG, and echo done and then my doc would come in and chat with me and tell me things look “about the same” and that I should continue with my meds—and I would keep on trucking along. That was my average heart year.

Unfortunately, this isn’t my average heart year. I would say that I am having the worst heart year ever. In my last blog post I explained that I was admitted for the first time in more than 20 years. Well so far this year I have been admitted three times, have worn no fewer than five Holter monitors, plus a BP monitor, and have had my first cardiac ablation.

By ACHA on 6/25/2014 9:34 AM

By Yvonne Hall

In the fall, before my daughter’s latest crisis, I posted the first in a series of tidbits I wanted to share with parents of cardiac patients on what I have learned through decades of trial and error. Some of these memories are positive but others will address where possibly better choices could have been made. This message relates to how easy it is to forget our other children‘s needs during such times.